Starlight Day

Wellington St, Perth   0292927000
Overview

Held nationally, Starlight Day aims to raise much-needed funds to support the long-term wellbeing of sick kids and their families around Australia.

In Detail

Starlight Chief Executive Officer, Louise Baxter said: "We urgently need your help on Starlight Day to allow us to continue to transform young lives and lift the spirits of sick kids around the country.

“Taking part in Starlight Day is a fun and inspiring experience, as helping to raise just $39 connects one child to Starlight’s in-hospital programs for one year."

The fundraising target of $1.5 million would allow Starlight to support more than 40,000 sick kids and teens through its in-hospital programs for one year.

Starlight Day merchandise including Starlight water bottles ($10), teddy bears ($10) and pens ($5) will be available in Big W stores exclusively throughout April, while volunteers will be on the streets on Starlight Day selling star post-it notes ($5), Shine On Kids DVDs ($10), Dinnertime! cookbooks ($30), Dinosaur Designs key rings ($5), flashing wands ($5) and more. Starlight Day is proudly supported by EB Games and Big W.

Individuals, corporations, schools and community groups are encouraged to get involved in Starlight Day, to donate, volunteer and help fundraise.

To find out how you can volunteer, fundraise, or make a donation, go to https://starlight.org.au/what-we-do/campaigns-and-events/national-campaigns/starlight-dayor phone 1300 727 827.

About the Starlight Children’s Foundation
Established in Australia in 1988, the Starlight Children's Foundation transforms the experience of hospitalisation and treatment for seriously ill children and their families, around Australia. Starlight’s innovative programs are integral to the total care of seriously ill children. While health professionals focus on treating the illness, Starlight is there to help care for the child, and support the longer term wellbeing and resilience of the child and their family. Starlight's programs supported more than 130,000 sick and hospitalised Australian kids last year.