Breastique Art


Whether you have two breasts, one breast, or both breasts removed, you can make the most incredible art with your body.

In Brief
  • Establishment Date: 2009
In Detail

About Us

Shiona preparing a canvas….
Let's start off with a story...

In January 2009 I hosted a housewarming party in Stirling, inviting dear friends to bring their energy and love into my new home. Standing in the courtyard was a white canvas that guests were encouraged to paint to remind me of the great night we had.

Throughout the evening, friends offered splashes of colour, shapes, stripes, etc, but a cheeky friend however, caused quite a stir when she said she was going to paint the canvas with her breasts! We looked at her dumbfounded – we're all quite liberal minded, but we don't get our 'assets' out at the drop of a hat, so we watched intently to see how she was going to achieve such a task.

With great gustso, she whipped off her top, plonked some paint on her breasts and then pressed herself up against the canvas. We all held our breath as she peeled herself off to reveal two large circular imprints that looked like to two big happy eyes!

Everyone was impressed by this random act of freedom and creativity,
and it created quite a buzz in for the rest of the evening.

For quite some time after, our close-knit group would talk about how fun and liberating it must have been to paint with breasts rather than a brush, so I made the suggestion that we all get together for a workshop and BYO our own canvas and paints and do some 'breast art.' This was met met with inspired smiles and nodding of heads at this which spurred on my next idea: "How about we sell the breast art we create and give proceeds to a breast cancer charity?" The crew responded with: "YEAH, LET'S DO THAT!" And so Breastique Art was born.

Many of us who brainstormed the Breastique Art concept could relate to breast cancer on a very personal level. We had all known someone who had died from breast cancer or who were receiving treatment for it, and many of us had already experienced the fear and dread of having a breast lump examined.

For me on a personal level, my I felt a real sense of loss when my Aunt Marion died of breast cancer. 'Mazz', as I used to call her, was a vibrant, cheeky lady who always saw the bright side of life. She never cared if she looked silly while enjoying herself, she just wanted to create a fun, dynamic, space wherever she went. Even during her last days, she talked about all the things she was grateful for and continued to focus on the positives in her life.

Breastique Art reveals my Aunt Mazz's attitude toward living by highlighting the fun and creativity of life, not caring about looking silly, but honouring what we've lost while celebrating what we still have.

Our connection to art recognises that art is often unique: no two pieces of art are the same, just like our breasts. Breasts are all different shapes and sizes and we are all magnificent in our uniqueness.