The Lily Dutch Windmill - Stirling Range

9793 Chester Pass Road, Amelup   (08) 9827 9205
Overview

THE LILY STIRLING RANGE - DUTCH WINDMILL, ACCOMMODATION, WINES AND RESTAURANT. SO CLOSE TO AND WITH FABULOUS VIEWS OF THE STIRLING RANGE THE LILY IS YOUR PERFECT BASE TO EXPLORE THE REGION

In Brief
  • Annual Production: Less than 10, 000 cases
  • Category: Winery
  • Facilities: Accommodation, By Appointment Only, Functions
  • Food: Restaurant
  • W/Region: Great Southern: All Great Southern
In Detail

The Lily Dutch Windmill - Stirling Range

Truly one of Australia’s most unique landmarks. This authentic 16th century replica, full size flour producing Dutch Windmill is the only flour-producing windmill on the Australian mainland.  With its 22 tonne cap and a sail length of 24.6 metres, it is also one of the largest traditional windmill ever built in Australia.  Wholemeal stone ground spelt flour is available and guided tours are conducted by appointment.

ACCOMMODATION & RAILWAY STATION RESTAURANT

Adjacent to the Windmill you will find traditional Dutch period houses and The Lily Railway Restaurant which is located in the original Federation style Railway Station re-located from the town of Gnowangerup. 

The Lily has been selected as one of the 10 best self-contained accommodations in FOOTPRINT WEST COAST AUSTRALIA HANDBOOK

OUR OPENINGS HOURS

The Lily is open 7-days for accommodation, guided windmill tours, wine and Spelt flour sales. The Lily Restaurant is occasionally open by booking only for Morning / Afternoon Teas and Dinner and is fully licensed. Dinner and Breakfast basket is available for our accommodation guests, 7-days.

Bookings essential.

DC3 - Dakota - C47 - Gooney Bird

This famous 1944 war bird is currently being restored at its final resting place at The Lily Dutch Windmill. This aircraft was issued to the Netherlands East Indies Transport Section, based in Brisbane, Queensland, where it was used for transport duties on behalf on K.N.I.L.M. The aircraft operated supply flights for Dutch military units, and later the airlifting of liberated Dutch P.O.W.'s from New Guinea to Australia.

Private airstrip available, for details see website.

Phone 08 9827 9205 Fax 08 9827 9206

Web: www.thelily.com.au

Email: thelilydutchwindmill@bigpond.com

 

STIRLING RANGE NATIONAL PARK

The brooding beauty of the mountain landscape, its stunning and unique wildflowers and the challenge of climbing Bluff Knoll have long drawn bushwalkers and climbers to the Stirling Range National Park. At 1,095 metres above sea level, Bluff Knoll is the highest peak in the south-west of Western Australia. The main face of the bluff forms one of the most impressive cliffs in the Australian mainland.

Wildflower wonderland

The number and beauty of the wildflowers is staggering. The park is one of the world's most important areas for flora, with 1,500 species (many of which grow nowhere else) packed within its boundaries. More species occur in the Stirling Range than in the entire British Isles and 87 plant species found in the Stirling Range occur nowhere else on earth. This tally includes the famous mountain bells of the genus Darwinia. Needless to say, spring wildflower viewing is incredible.

Walks

BLUFF KNOLL - This 5 km return, 3-4 hour walk is of medium difficulty, if taken slowly. TOOLBRUNUP - Hard 4 km, 3-4 hour walk has magnificent 360ß views from the summit. MOUNT MAGOG - Hard (pegs as markers for final kilometre to the summit), 8 km 3-4 hour return walk. TALYUBERLUP - Medium, 3 km 2-3 hour return walk. MOUNT HASSELL - Medium 4 km, 1.5-2 hour return walk. MOUNT TRIO - Medium 3 km, 1.5-2 hour walk.

Climate, clouds and snow

An ideal time to visit is late spring and early summer (October to December), when days are beginning to warm up and the wildflowers are at their best. Winter, between June and August, is cold and wet, and visitors should come prepared. Even in spring the weather can be unpredictable, particularly higher in the range. Sudden cold changes cause the temperature to drop and rain or hail to set in. All visitors are strongly advised not to enter the bush or use footpaths on days of extreme fire danger. The Stirling Range is renowned for its unusual, and sometimes spectacular cloud formations. Park visitors may notice two types of unusual cloud formations about the peaks, often when the rest of the sky is clear. A shallow, low-level stratified cloud that drapes over the higher peaks is a familiar sight. Another type of shallow cloud layer may leave the higher peaks exposed, which is a unique sight in Western Australia.


The above information is provided by DEC, Department of Environment and Conservation WA. For more information please visit DEC website (www.dec.wa.gov.au

A Stirling Range brochure in a PDF format is available from the same site.